UNIVERSAL BRIDGE

Lee Holden

Mark Tanner Sculpture Award winner 2022/23

15 March to 27 April 2024

PV: Friday 15 March, 6-8pm

Cross Lane Projects is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new work by Lee Holden, winner of the Mark Tanner Sculpture Award 2022/23.

This exhibition was developed over the preceding year by Lee Holden (b.1972, Accrington, Lancashire, UK), the 20th recipient of the Mark Tanner Sculpture Award.

Universal Bridge is a site-specific installation focusing upon the “mindset”, technology, and infrastructure of governance, as well as the potential consequences of resistance to enforced technological change. The piece set up a complex dialogue between, on the one hand, authority, progress, and control and, on the other, sabotage, disruption, and critique.

Using a vast array of found, collected, and reconfigured materials alongside specifically sourced instruments and tools, Holden transforms the gallery’s unique display spaces so as to suggest a military or government research station devoted to clandestine activities of dubious intent. Something very disturbing happened here: an irreversible accident or transgressive intrusion took place.

The MTSA is one of the most significant awards for emerging UK artists working in the field of sculpture. It seeks to reward outstanding and innovative practice, with a particular interest in work that demonstrates a commitment to process, or sensitivity to material. Holden was the 20th winner of the annual sculpture prize and received: £10,000 towards the production of this new work; a solo exhibition at Standpoint in 2023; and a National Touring Programme.

Holden was selected from close to 300 submissions by a judging panel, comprising: Mike Nelson RA; Jane Bhoyroo, Producer at Yorkshire Sculpture International; Rebecca Scott, director at Cross Lane Projects and Mark Tanner Trust; and Rosie Edwards, MTSA winner 2021/22.

Universal Bridge’ tours the UK, as part of the MTSAs National Touring Programme beginning at Standpoint Gallery in May 2023.

Photos Credit: Tim Bowditch